VMS 21 / B.B. KING - Sweet Sixteen

Pris: 145,00 NOK
VMS 21 - B.B. King 1960 USA / Vinyl; EX Orginal pressing ! --------------------- Birth name Riley B. King Born September 16, 1925 Berclair, Mississippi, U.S. Origin Memphis, Tennessee, U.S. Died May 14, 2015 (aged 89) Las Vegas, Nevada Genres Blues, R&B, blues rock[1] Occupation(s) Singer, songwriter, musician, record producer, actor Instruments Vocals, guitar Years active 1948–2015 --------------- Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known by his stage name B.B. King, was an American blues singer, songwriter, and guitarist. Rolling Stone ranked King No. 6 on its 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.[2] King introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that influenced many later electric blues guitarists.[3] King was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987 and is considered one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, earning the nickname "The King of the Blues", and one of the "Three Kings of the Blues Guitar" along with Albert and Freddie.[4][5][6] King was known for performing tirelessly throughout his musical career, appearing at more than 200 concerts per year on average into his 70s.[7] In 1956, he reportedly appeared at 342 shows.[8] King died at the age of 89 in Las Vegas, Nevada on May 14, 2015 from complications of Alzheimer's disease along with congestive heart failure and diabetic complications. -------------- les mer på Wikipedia...

ODS 365 / McGUINNES FLINT - Malt and barley blues

Pris: 125,00 NOK
ODS 365 - McGuinnes Flint 1971 DE / Vinyl; EX - Cover; EX ---------------------------- McGuinness Flint was a rock band formed in 1970 by Tom McGuinness, former bassist and guitarist with Manfred Mann, and Hughie Flint, former drummer with John Mayall; plus vocalist and keyboard player Dennis Coulson, and multi-instrumentalists and singer-songwriters Benny Gallagher and Graham Lyle. ---------------- Career Their first single "When I'm Dead and Gone" reached No.2 on the UK Singles Chart at the end of 1970 and No.47 on the Billboard pop chart and No.35 on the Cashbox pop chart in the U.S., No. 5 in Ireland and No. 31 in Canada.[2][3]) The debut album McGuinness Flint also made the Top 10 of the UK Albums Chart.[4] In 1999, it received another outing, in the soundtrack of the film, East is East. A follow-up single, "Malt and Barley Blues", was a UK No.5 hit in 1971,[4] but the group foundered under the pressures of instant success, being required to record a second album and reproduce their recorded sound adequately on stage, which resulted in disappointing concerts, then a series of illnesses among the band members cancelled most of the concerts on their first tour. According to McGuinness, at this time the band consisted of two groups of close-knit friends, the first being Flint, McGuinness, and Coulson, and the other being Gallagher and Lyle. Though these two units generally got along well, a key disagreement between them was that the first group felt the band should focus on touring and performing, while the Gallagher/Lyle camp felt they should focus on songwriting and recording.[5] The second album Happy Birthday Ruthy Baby failed to chart, as did the title track when released as a single, but contained some Gallagher and Lyle songs, notably "Sparrow", which attracted cover versions.[1] Gallagher and Lyle left towards the end of 1971 to record as a duo, and would enjoy major success in 1976 with their hit-laden fifth album Breakaway.[1] McGuinness Flint would continue to play some of their compositions in live performances.[5] After several temporary members came and went, including comedian Neil Innes on piano, the group then recruited bassist Dixie Dean on a permanent basis, and recorded Lo and Behold, an album of Bob Dylan songs (which had not yet been officially recorded and released by the writer himself). This album was credited to Coulson, Dean, McGuinness, Flint, and issued in 1972.[1] A single "Let The People Go" was banned by the BBC as it related to the Ulster crisis, a fate which also befell a contemporary single by Wings, "Give Ireland Back to the Irish". Coulson left to record a solo album for Elektra Records, and was replaced by Lou Stonebridge on keyboards and Jim Evans on guitar.[1] This new line-up recorded two further albums. Neither of these recordings sold well and the group broke up in 1975.[1] A splinter group, Stonebridge McGuinness, had a minor hit in 1979 with "Oo-Eeh Baby" (No. 54 in the UK[6]) and released the album Corporate Madness on RCA Records the following year.[1] This group proved short-lived, however, and afterwards McGuinness and Flint both joined The Blues Band, which featured former Manfred Mann vocalist and harmonica player, Paul Jones.[1] Stonebridge had a stint in early 80s classic soul revival outfit The Dance Band, who recorded for the PRT-distributed Double D label. McGuinness briefly reunited with Graham Lyle in 1983 to form the Lyle McGuinness Band, a short-lived folk rock ensemble that recorded a single, "Elise", and an album, Acting on Impulse, for the independent Cool King label; in Germany, this set was granted a major label release on Polydor. Lyle's songwriting career exploded soon afterwards with the worldwide success of his composition "What's Love Got to Do with It?" for Tina Turner, ensuring that the Lyle McGuinness Band would not continue. Diamond Recordings reissued the album on CD in 1997 as Elise, Elise, with the addition of the non-album single plus a previously unreleased song. McGuinness continues to record and perform as a member of both The Blues Band and The Manfreds, the latter outfit being an amalgamation of 1960s Manfred Mann members that has operated since 1992. Dennis Coulson died on 15 January 2006. -------------------- les mer om dem på Wikipedia !

ODS 342 / SUPREMES - Love child

Pris: 165,00 NOK
ODS 342 - The SUPREMES 1968 SVENSK / Vinyl; EX - Cover; EX ------------------------- Also known as The Primettes; Diana Ross & the Supremes Origin Detroit, Michigan, United States Genres Rhythm and blues, doo-wop, soul, pop, disco Years active 1959–1977 --------------------- The Supremes were an American female singing group and the premier act of Motown Records during the 1960s. Founded as the Primettes in Detroit, Michigan, in 1959, the Supremes were the most commercially successful of Motown's acts and are, to date, America's most successful vocal group[2] with 12 number one singles on the Billboard Hot 100.[3] Most of these hits were written and produced by Motown's main songwriting and production team, Holland–Dozier–Holland. At their peak in the mid-1960s, the Supremes rivaled the Beatles in worldwide popularity,[3] and their success made it possible for future African American R&B and soul musicians to find mainstream success.[3] Founding members Florence Ballard, Mary Wilson, Diana Ross, and Betty McGlown, all from the Brewster-Douglass public housing project in Detroit,[4] formed the Primettes as the sister act to the Primes (with Paul Williams and Eddie Kendricks, who went on to form the Temptations).[4] Barbara Martin replaced McGlown in 1960, and the group signed with Motown the following year as the Supremes. Martin left the act in early 1962, and Ross, Ballard, and Wilson carried on as a trio. During the mid-1960s, the Supremes achieved mainstream success with Ross as lead singer. In 1967, Motown president Berry Gordy renamed the group Diana Ross & the Supremes, and replaced Ballard with Cindy Birdsong. Ross left to pursue a solo career in 1970 and was replaced by Jean Terrell, at which point the group's name reverted to the Supremes. After 1972, the lineup changed more frequently; Lynda Laurence, Scherrie Payne, and Susaye Greene all became members of the group during the mid-1970s. The Supremes disbanded in 1977 after 18 years. --------------- Single/ utgivelser; All singles released on Motown Records except for the Primettes' "Tears of Sorrow" b/w "Pretty Baby", issued on Lu Pine Records. Year 1960 1960 - The Primettes - "Tears of Sorrow"/"Pretty Baby" 1961 - The Supremes - "I Want a Guy" /"Never Again" 1961 - The Supremes - "Buttered Popcorn" / "Who's Lovin' You" 1962 - The Supremes - "Your Heart Belongs to Me"/"(He's) Seventeen" 1962 - The Supremes - "Let Me Go the Right Way" / "Time Changes Things" 1963 - The Supremes - "My Heart Can't Take It No More" / "You Bring Back Memories" 1963 - The Supremes - "A Breathtaking Guy" /(The Man with the) Rock and Roll Banjo Band" 1963 - The Supremes - "When the Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes"/"Standing at the Crossroads of Love" 1964 - The Supremes - "Run, Run, Run" / "I'm Giving You Your Freedom" 1964 - The Supremes - Where Did Our Love Go" / "He Means the World to Me" 1964 - The Supremes - Baby Love" / "Ask Any Girl" 1964 - The Supremes - Come See About Me" /"(You're Gone But) Always in My Heart" 1965 - The Supremes - "Stop! In the Name of Love" / "I'm in Love Again" 1965 - The Supremes - "Back in My Arms Again" / "Whisper You Love Me Boy" 1965 - The Supremes - "The Only Time I'm Happy" /Supremes interview 1965 - The Supremes - "Nothing but Heartaches" / "He Holds His Own" 1965 - The Supremes - "Things Are Changing" /"Things Are Changing" 1965 - The Supremes - "I Hear a Symphony" / "Who Could Ever Doubt My Love" 1965 - The Supremes - "Children's Christmas Song" / "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Me" 1965 - The Supremes - "My World Is Empty Without You" / "Everything is Good About You" 1966 - The Supremes - "Love Is Like an Itching in My Heart" / "He's All I Got" 1966 - The Supremes - "You Can't Hurry Love" / "Put Yourself in My Place" 1966 - The Supremes - "You Keep Me Hangin' On" / "Remove This Doubt" 1967 - The Supremes - "Love Is Here and Now You're Gone" / "There's No Stopping Us Now" 1967 - The Supremes - "The Happening" / "All I Know About You" ------- Diana Ross & The Supremes 1967 "Reflections" / "Going Down for the Third Time" 1967 - "In and Out of Love" / "I Guess I'll Always Love You" 1968 - "Forever Came Today" /"Time Changes Things" 1968 - "Some Things You Never Get Used To" /"You've Been So Wonderful to Me" 1968 - "Love Child" /"Will This Be the Day" 1968 - "I'm Gonna Make You Love Me" /"A Place in the Sun" 1969 - "I'm Livin' in Shame" /"I'm So Glad (I Got Somebody Like You Around)" 1969 - "I'll Try Something New" /"The Way You Do the Things You Do" 1969 - "The Composer" / "The Beginning of the End" 1969 - "No Matter What Sign You Are" / "The Young Folks" 1969 - "The Weight" / "For Better or Worse" 1969 - "I Second That Emotion" /"The Way You Do the Things You Do" 1969 - "Someday We'll Be Together" / "He's My Sunny Boy" 1970 - "Why (Must We Fall in Love)" / "Uptight (Everything's Alright)" 1970 - "The Rhythm of Life" / "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" ------- The Supremes 1970 - "Up the Ladder to the Roof" / "Bill, When Are You Coming Back" 1970 - "Everybody's Got the Right to Love" / "But I Love You More" 1970 - "Stoned Love" / "Shine on Me" 1970 - "River Deep – Mountain High" / "Together We Can Make Such Sweet Music" 1971 "Nathan Jones" / "Happy (Is a Bumpy Road)" 1971 - "You Gotta Have Love in Your Heart" / "I'm Glad About It" 1971 - "Touch" / "It's So Hard for Me to Say Good-bye" 1971 - "Floy Joy" / "This Is the Story" 1972 - "Automatically Sunshine" / "Precious Little Things" 1972 - "Without the One You Love" /"Let's Make Love Now" 1972 - "Your Wonderful, Sweet Sweet Love" / "The Wisdom of Time" 1972 - "I Guess I'll Miss the Man" / "Over and Over" 1972 - "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)" / "Where Would I Be Without You Baby" 1973 - "Bad Weather" / "Oh Be My Love" 1973 - "Tossin' and Turnin'" / "Oh Be My Love" 1974 - "Baby Love" / "Ask Any Girl" 1974 - "Where Did Our Love Go" / "Nothing but He

ODS 246 / Z Z TOP - Viva Las Vegas

Pris: 95,00 NOK
ODS 246 - ZZ TOP - 1992 UK

ODS 284 / GARY MOORE - After the war

Pris: 95,00 NOK
ODS 284 - Gary Moore 1988 UK / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX ------------------------- Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore. The song, entitled Grief Neve

ODS 285 / GARY MOORE - Ready for love

Pris: 125,00 NOK
ODS 285 - Gary Moore 1989 DE / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX ------------------------- Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore. The song, entitled Grief Nev

ODS 286 / GARY MOORE - Walking by myself

Pris: 125,00 NOK
ODS 286 - Gary Moore 1990 UK / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX --------------------------- Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore.

ODS 287 / GARY MORE & PHIL LYNOTT - Out in the fie

Pris: 75,00 NOK
ODS 287 - Gary More & Phil Lynott ( ex, Thin Lizzy ) / Vinyl; EX - Cover; VG+ --------------------------- Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore.

ODS 288 / GARY MOORE & B.B.KING - Since i met you

Pris: 145,00 NOK
ODS 288 - Gary Moore & B.B. King 1992 UK / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX --------------------- Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore.

ODS 289 / GARY MOORE - Over the hills and far away

Pris: 95,00 NOK
ODS 289 - Gary Moore 1986 UK / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX ----------------------- Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore.

OD-075 / ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND - Straight From Th

Pris: 125,00 NOK
OD - 075 - ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND - 1981 US - Kval vinyl; NM - Pris kr 145.- Sjedent cover ! ----------------- The Allman Brothers Band Rock band · allmanbrothersband.com The Allman Brothers Band was an American rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman and Gregg Allman, as well as Dickey Betts, Berry Oakley, Butch Trucks, and Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson. Wikipedia Origin: Macon, GA (1969) Albums: At Fillmore East, Eat a Peach, Brothers and Sisters, More Genres: Southern rock, Jam band, Blues rock, Country rock

ODS 290 / GARY MOORE - Friday on my mind

Pris: 135,00 NOK
ODS 290 - Gary Moore 1987 UK / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX ------------------------ Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore.

ODS 291 / GARY MOORE - Hold on to love

Pris: 125,00 NOK
ODS 291 - Gary Moore 1983 UK / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX ------------------------- Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore.

ODS 292 / GARY MOORE - The loner

Pris: 125,00 NOK
ODS 292 - Gary Moore 1987 UK / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX ------------------------ Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore.

ODS 297 / GARY MOORE - Empty Rooms

Pris: 95,00 NOK
ODS 297 - Gary Moore 1985 UK - 85`Remix versjon Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX -------------------- Birth name; Robert William Gary Moore . Born 4 April 1952 Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Died; 6 February 2011 (aged 58) - Estepona, Malaga Province, Spain Genres; Blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal, Blues, progressive rock, jazz fusion Occupation(s) ; Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer Instruments; Vocals, guitar, harmonica, keyboards Years active; 1969 – 2011 ------------------- Robert William Gary Moore (4 April 1952[1] – 6 February 2011) was a Northern Irish musician, most widely recognised as a singer and virtuoso guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, Moore played with musicians including Phil Lynott and Brian Downey during his teens, leading him to memberships with the Irish bands Skid Row and Thin Lizzy, and British Band Colosseum II. Moore shared the stage with such blues and rock musicians as B.B. King, Albert King, Jack Bruce, Albert Collins, George Harrison, and Greg Lake, as well as having a successful solo career. He guested on a number of albums recorded by high-profile musicians. ------ Early life and career Moore grew up on Castleview Road opposite Stormont Parliament Buildings, off the Upper Newtownards Road in east Belfast, as one of five children of Bobby, a promoter, and Winnie, a housewife. He left the city as a teenager, because of troubles in his family – his parents parted a year later – just as The Troubles were starting in Northern Ireland.[2] Moore started performing at a young age, having picked up a battered acoustic guitar at the age of eight. He got his first quality guitar at the age of 14, learning to play the right-handed instrument in the standard way despite being left-handed. Aiming to become a musician, he moved to Dublin at the age of 16. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin. Green's continued influence on Moore was later repaid as a tribute to Green on his 1995 album Blues for Greeny, an album consisting entirely of Green compositions. On this tribute album, Moore played Green's 1959 Les Paul Standard guitar which Green had lent to Moore after leaving Fleetwood Mac. Moore ultimately purchased the guitar, at Green's request, so that "it would have a good home".[3] Other early musical influences were artists such as Albert King, Elvis Presley, The Shadows, and The Beatles. Later, having seen Jimi Hendrix and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in his home town of Belfast, his own style was developing into a blues-rock sound that would be the dominant form of his career in music. Changing bands In Dublin, Moore joined the group Skid Row with Noel Bridgeman and Brendan "Brush" Shiels. It was with this group that he earned a reputation in the music industry, and his association with Phil Lynott began.[4] In 1970, Moore moved to England and remained there, apart from two short periods in the United States. In 1973, under the name "The Gary Moore Band", he released his first solo album, Grinding Stone. "Grinding Stone" was issued in North America on Neil Kempfer-Stocker's fledgling record label imprint Cosmos and received "Album of the Year" accolades on KTAC-FM/Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, in 1974. In 1974 he re-joined Lynott, when he first joined Thin Lizzy after the departure of founding member Eric Bell. From 1975 to August 1978, he was a member of Colosseum II. With the band he also collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber on the composer's Variations album in 1978. In 1977, Moore re-joined Thin Lizzy, first as a temporary replacement for Brian Robertson, and on a permanent basis a year later. Solo career In July 1979, he left the band permanently to focus on his solo career, again with help from Phil Lynott. The combination of Moore's blues-based guitar and Lynott's voice produced "Parisienne Walkways", which reached the Top Ten in the UK Singles Chart in April 1979 and the Thin Lizzy album Black Rose: A Rock Legend which reached number two in the UK album chart. Moore appears in the videos for "Waiting for an Alibi" and "Do Anything You Want To". Moore performing at the Manchester Apollo, 1985 He experimented with many musical genres, including rock, jazz, blues, country, electric blues, hard rock, and heavy metal.[5] In 1987, he performed a guitar solo for a cover of the Beatles' "Let It Be" which was released under the group-name of Ferry Aid. The record raised substantial funds for the survivors of the MS Herald of Free Enterprise disaster. In 1990, he played the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. Moore performing, 23 October 2010 After a series of rock records, Moore returned to blues music with Still Got the Blues (1990), with contributions from Albert King, Albert Collins, and George Harrison. The album was well received by fans and was certified Gold in the U.S. He stayed with the blues format until 1997 when he returned to the harder rock, but with a softer, more pop and ballad-oriented sound on Dark Days in Paradise followed with another change of direction in 1999, when he decided to experiment with modern dance beats on A Different Beat; this left many fans, as well as the music press, confused. He also contributed guitar sections to Richard Blackwood's 2000 album, You'll Love to Hate This. With Back to the Blues, Moore returned to his tried and tested blues format in 2001: he continued with this style on Power of the Blues (2004), Old New Ballads Blues (2006), Close As You Get (2007), and Bad For You Baby (2008). In January 2005, Moore joined the One World Project, which recorded a song for the 2004 Asian Tsunami relief effort. The group featured Russell Watson, Boy George, Steve Winwood, Barry Gibb, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Dewey Bunnell, Gerry Beckley, and Robin Gibb on vocals (in their order of appearance), and featured a guitar solo by Moore.