LP 554 / BROOKE BENTON - Endlessy

Pris: 185,00 NOK
LP 554 - Brooke Benton Orginal LP 1959 USA / Vinyl; VG+ ( riper ) - Cover; EX ------------------------ Birth name Benjamin Franklin Peay Born September 19, 1931 Lugoff, South Carolina, United States Died April 9, 1988 (aged 56) Queens, New York, United States Genres Pop, R&B, soul Occupation(s) Singer, songwriter, actor Instruments Vocals Years active 1958–88 ------------------ rook Benton, born Benjamin Franklin Peay, (September 19, 1931 – April 9, 1988) was an American singer and songwriter who was popular with rock and roll, rhythm and blues, and pop music audiences during the late 1950s and early 1960s, when he scored hits such as "It's Just A Matter of Time" and "Endlessly", many of which he co-wrote. He made a comeback in 1970 with the ballad "Rainy Night in Georgia." Benton scored over 50 Billboard chart hits as an artist, and also wrote hits for other performers. ----------------- Success Finally in 1959 he made his breakthrough with his hits "It's Just a Matter of Time" and "Endlessly". "It's Just a Matter of Time" peaked at #3 on the United States Billboard Hot 100 chart, and sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.[3] "Endlessly" made it to #12. Both of the first two hits were written by Benton with Clyde Otis. They were originally offered to Nat King Cole, but when Otis became an A&R manage and producer at Mercury, he convinced Benton to sign with the label and record them himself, while asking Cole not to record the songs as planned.[4] Benton followed this success with a series of hits, including "So Many Ways" (#6), "Hotel Happiness" (#3), "Think Twice" (#11), "Kiddio" (#7), and "The Boll Weevil Song" (#2). In 1960, he had two top 10 hit duets with Dinah Washington: "Baby (You've Got What It Takes)" (#5) and "A Rockin' Good Way (To Mess Around and Fall in Love)" (#7).[5] He also recorded his own version of "Take Good Care of Her" in 1962. In the mid and late 1960s, Benton recorded for RCA Records and Reprise Records with minimal commercial success. In 1969, he signed with Cotillion Records, a subsidiary of Atlantic Records, where the next year he had his last major hit with "Rainy Night in Georgia", written by Tony Joe White and produced and arranged by Arif Mardin. a million-seller which topped the Billboard R&B chart.[5] Benton eventually charted 49 singles on the Billboard Hot 100, with other songs charting on Billboard′s rhythm and blues, easy listening, and Christmas music charts.[6] The last album made by Benton was Fools Rush In, which was released posthumously in 2005. At one point he was recording on All-Platinum and [Groove Records]].[7] Death Weakened from spinal meningitis, Brook died of pneumonia in Queens, New York City, at the age of 56 on April 9, 1988. He was survived by his wife, Mary Benton, and five children, Brook Jr., Vanessa, Roy, Gerald and Benjamin, all of Queens. ---------------- Albums Year Album United States Pop 1959 It's Just A Matter of Time - 1959 Endlessly - 1959 This Time of Year 12 1960 I Love You in So Many Ways - 1961 Golden Hits 82 1961 The Boll Weevil Song And 11 Other Great Hits 70 1962 If You Believe 77 1962 Singing the Blues – Lie to Me 40 1963 Golden Hits, Volume 2 82 1963 Best Ballads of Broadway - 1964 Born To Sing The Blues - 1964 Laura (What's He Got That I Ain't Got) 156 1969 Do Your Own Thing 189 1970 Brook Benton Today (1.) 27 1970 Homestyle 199 1972 Story Teller - 1973 Something for Everyone - 1977 The Incomparable Brook Benton – 20 Greatest Hits (Warwick) -

LP 553 / BROOK BENTON - The Boll Weevil Song

Pris: 245,00 NOK
LP 553 - Brooke Benton - Org.LP 1961 USA / Vinyl; EX - Cover; EX ------------------------ Birth name Benjamin Franklin Peay Born September 19, 1931 Lugoff, South Carolina, United States Died April 9, 1988 (aged 56) Queens, New York, United States Genres Pop, R&B, soul Occupation(s) Singer, songwriter, actor Instruments Vocals Years active 1958–88 ------------------ rook Benton, born Benjamin Franklin Peay, (September 19, 1931 – April 9, 1988) was an American singer and songwriter who was popular with rock and roll, rhythm and blues, and pop music audiences during the late 1950s and early 1960s, when he scored hits such as "It's Just A Matter of Time" and "Endlessly", many of which he co-wrote. He made a comeback in 1970 with the ballad "Rainy Night in Georgia." Benton scored over 50 Billboard chart hits as an artist, and also wrote hits for other performers. ----------------- Success Finally in 1959 he made his breakthrough with his hits "It's Just a Matter of Time" and "Endlessly". "It's Just a Matter of Time" peaked at #3 on the United States Billboard Hot 100 chart, and sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.[3] "Endlessly" made it to #12. Both of the first two hits were written by Benton with Clyde Otis. They were originally offered to Nat King Cole, but when Otis became an A&R manage and producer at Mercury, he convinced Benton to sign with the label and record them himself, while asking Cole not to record the songs as planned.[4] Benton followed this success with a series of hits, including "So Many Ways" (#6), "Hotel Happiness" (#3), "Think Twice" (#11), "Kiddio" (#7), and "The Boll Weevil Song" (#2). In 1960, he had two top 10 hit duets with Dinah Washington: "Baby (You've Got What It Takes)" (#5) and "A Rockin' Good Way (To Mess Around and Fall in Love)" (#7).[5] He also recorded his own version of "Take Good Care of Her" in 1962. In the mid and late 1960s, Benton recorded for RCA Records and Reprise Records with minimal commercial success. In 1969, he signed with Cotillion Records, a subsidiary of Atlantic Records, where the next year he had his last major hit with "Rainy Night in Georgia", written by Tony Joe White and produced and arranged by Arif Mardin. a million-seller which topped the Billboard R&B chart.[5] Benton eventually charted 49 singles on the Billboard Hot 100, with other songs charting on Billboard′s rhythm and blues, easy listening, and Christmas music charts.[6] The last album made by Benton was Fools Rush In, which was released posthumously in 2005. At one point he was recording on All-Platinum and [Groove Records]].[7] Death Weakened from spinal meningitis, Brook died of pneumonia in Queens, New York City, at the age of 56 on April 9, 1988. He was survived by his wife, Mary Benton, and five children, Brook Jr., Vanessa, Roy, Gerald and Benjamin, all of Queens. ---------------- Albums Year Album United States Pop 1959 It's Just A Matter of Time - 1959 Endlessly - 1959 This Time of Year 12 1960 I Love You in So Many Ways - 1961 Golden Hits 82 1961 The Boll Weevil Song And 11 Other Great Hits 70 1962 If You Believe 77 1962 Singing the Blues – Lie to Me 40 1963 Golden Hits, Volume 2 82 1963 Best Ballads of Broadway - 1964 Born To Sing The Blues - 1964 Laura (What's He Got That I Ain't Got) 156 1969 Do Your Own Thing 189 1970 Brook Benton Today (1.) 27 1970 Homestyle 199 1972 Story Teller - 1973 Something for Everyone - 1977 The Incomparable Brook Benton – 20 Greatest Hits (Warwick) -

LP 365 / TOWER OF POWER - Live and in living color

Pris: 175,00 NOK
LP 365 - Tower of Power - 1976 USA / Soulrock, Rock, Funkrock,Jazzrock, R&B Vinyl; NM- - Cover; EX+ ------------------------ Origin Oakland, California, United States Genres Soul, funk, R&B, jazz, jazz-funk Years active 1968–present Labels Warner Bros., Columbia, Epic, San Francisco, SPV Associated acts Cold Blood, Sons of Champlin, Santana, Doobie Brothers --------------- Tower of Power (or TOP for short) is an American R&B-based horn section and band, originating in Oakland, California, that has been performing since 1968.[1] They are best known for their funky soul sound highlighted by a powerful horn section and precisely syncopated bass-guitar lines. There have been multiple lead vocalists, the most well-known being Lenny Williams, who fronted the band between early 1973 and late 1974, the period of their greatest commercial success. Their highest-charting songs include "You're Still a Young Man", "So Very Hard to Go", "Soul With a Capital S", "Soul Vaccination", "What Is Hip?", and "Don't Change Horses (in the Middle of a Stream) History In the summer of 1968, tenor saxophonist/vocalist Emilio Castillo met Stephen "Doc" Kupka, who played baritone sax. Castillo had played in several bands, but Castillo's father told his son to "hire that guy" after a home audition.[2] Together, they became the backbone of Tower of Power. Within months the group, then known as The Motowns, began playing various gigs around Oakland and Berkeley, their soul sound relating to both minority and rebellious listeners.[3] Castillo really wanted to play Bill Graham's Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco, but he realized he would never get in with a name like The Motowns. So, on a break from recording in a little studio in Hayward, Castillo was sitting on the studio owner's desk, and right in front of him was a long list of weird band names. He looked through it and saw Tower of Power and thought "Yeah, that describes us." The band agreed so the name stuck.[4] By 1970, the now renamed Tower of Power—now including trumpet/arranger Greg Adams, first trumpet Mic Gillette, first saxophone Skip Mesquite, Francis "Rocco" Prestia on bass, Willie Fulton on guitar, and drummer David Garibaldi—signed a recording contract with Bill Graham's San Francisco Records and released their first album, East Bay Grease. Rufus Miller performed most of the lead vocals on this debut album.[3] The group was first introduced to the San Francisco Bay area by radio station KSAN, which played a variety of artists such as Cold Blood, Eric Mercury and Marvin Gaye's album "What's Goin On" in its entirety before the bay area's soul and R&B stations became aware. Dusty Street of the Flying Eye Radio Network's Fly Low show and Sirius XM radio was a DJ there in the late 1960s/early 1970s. The single "Sparkling in the Sand" received airplay on famed Bay Area soul station KDIA. Augmented by percussionist/conga/bongo player Brent Byars, Tower of Power was released from their San Francisco label contract and moved to Warner Bros. Records. With Rick Stevens now singing lead, 1972's Bump City gave the band their first national exposure. This album included the hit single "You're Still a Young Man", which peaked at #29 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was Stevens' pinnacle vocal performance before leaving the band.[5] Emilio Castillo, who, along with Stephen Kupka, co-wrote "You're Still a Young Man," told Songfacts that the song was based on a true story concerning a former girlfriend who was six years older.[6] Though not a big hit single "Down to the Nightclub" received heavy airplay on West Coast FM stations and several AM stations. Both songs still get substantial airplay on oldies radio and remain fan favorites. Tower of Power, released in the spring of 1973, was the third album for the band. It featured Lenny Williams on lead vocals and Lenny Pickett on lead tenor saxophone. Bruce Conte replaced guitarist Willie Fulton and keyboardist Chester Thompson also joined the band during the recording of the album. This was the group's most successful album. It peaked at #15 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart and was RIAA certified as a gold record (for sales in excess of 500,000 copies). The album also spawned their most-successful single "So Very Hard to Go". Although the single peaked at #17 on the Billboard Hot 100,[5] it landed in the Top 10 on the surveys of many West Coast Top 40 radio stations, hitting #1 on many of them. The album also charted two other singles on the Billboard Hot 100, "This Time It's Real" and "What Is Hip?" The latter is possibly their most enduring song. 1974's Back to Oakland spawned another hit, "Don't Change Horses (in the Middle of a Stream)", that reached #26 on the Billboard Hot 100, and "Time Will Tell", which charted at #69.[5] On some of their releases in the mid-1970s, such as Urban Renewal (1974), the band moved more toward funk than soul; however, they continued recording ballads as well. Williams left the band in late 1974, and was replaced as vocalist by Hubert Tubbs. Though the band remained popular, their days of chart radio airplay declined. During the late 1970s they briefly tried recording disco-sounding material.[3] Leader Emilio Castillo said in an interview that the band's brief foray into quasi-disco was at the request of Columbia Records, who had the band under contract at the time. Tower of Power still tours extensively today, although there have been many changes in personnel over the years. At least 60 musicians have toured or recorded with the band over their 40-plus-year existence. These include current Saturday Night Live musical director/saxophonist Lenny Pickett, drummer David Garibaldi, bassist Francis "Rocco" Prestia, organ master Chester Thompson, saxophonists Richard Elliot and Euge Groove, and guitarist Bruce Conte. Conte's cousin, BALCO founder Victor Conte, also played bass guitar in the band from the late 1970s to the early 1980s. Former lead vocalist Rick Stevens (real

LP 280 / MANDRILL - Just outside of town

Pris: 175,00 NOK
LP 280 - Mandrill - 1973 USA Vinyl; EX (noen hairlines ) - Cover; EX- (cutout ) -------------------- rigin Brooklyn, New York City, United States Genres; Funk, funk rock, jazz-funk, rock, world, Latin rock, Latin funk, soul,progressive rock Years active; 1970 - to the present. ------------- Mandrill is an American multi-genre band formed in Brooklyn, New York City in 1968. The band was seven members: Carlos Wilson (trombone, vocals), Lou Wilson (trumpet, vocals) and Ric Wilson (sax, vocals). The brothers were born in Panama and grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant area of Brooklyn. Claude 'Coffee' Cave II (keyboards, percussion, vocals, Bundy Cenac on bass for one album "Mandrill" replaced by Fudgie Kae Solomon in 1972 (bass, vocals), Charles Padro (drums, percussion, vocals) for two albums, replaced by Neftali Santiago in 1972 (drums, percussion, vocals), Omar Mesa (guitar, vocals) replaced by Doug Rodriguez in 1974 (lead guitar, vocals). This completed the Mandrill line-up from the Polydor years 1970–1975 which make up the Mandrill sound. Other members of the band in later years included Juaquin Jessup (lead guitar, percussion, vocals) and Tommy Trujillo on guitar. Their songs have been sampled by many hip-hop acts such as Johnny D, Public Enemy, DJ Shadow, Shawty Lo, Big L, Kanye West, Jin, Eminem, and 9th Wonder. They combined funk with many other styles like Latin, salsa, rock, blues and soul. Some of their songs have been used in the soundtracks of films: The Greatest (1977) directed by Tom Gries and Monte Hellman; and The Warriors (1979) directed by Walter Hill. The band continues to perform live; their signature song is arguably "Fencewalk." Composite Truth (1973) was the band's most commercially successful album. ------------------ Discography Albums 1970: Mandrill 1971: Mandrill Is 1972: Composite Truth 1973: Just Outside of Town 1974: Mandrilland 1975: Solid 1975: The Best of Mandrill 1975: Beast from the East 1977: The Greatest (with George Benson) film soundtrack 1978: We Are One 1979: New Worlds 1980: Getting in the Mood 1981: Energize 1981: The Warriors ("Echoes In My Mind" (with Luther Vandross) film soundtrack 1992: Rebirth 1997: Fencewalk: The Anthology 2000: The Ultimate Collection 2001: Peace and Love (EP for the 911 victims) 2001: Driving While Black and Brown 2002: live at Montreaux 2004: Pre-nuclear War Blues (single) 2004: Sunshine (single from the movie Civil Brand) 2005: Sunshine (compilation) 2009: untitled featuring "ablessing" (tribute to Barack Obama “Spirit Of Hiroshima” “We Gotta Get It (Right This Time), ”collaborators including George Duke, Gerald Albright & Chuck D. ---------- * se WIKIPEDIA for mer info !

LP 479 / WAR - Greatest Hits

Pris: 165,00 NOK
LP 479 - WAR ( Funk/rock ) 1976 USA - Vinyl; EX- / Cover; EX m, cutout -------------------------- Also known as Eric Burdon and War (1969–70, 1976) Origin Long Beach, California, United States Genres Funk electric blues soul R&B funk rock reggae fusion Latin brown-eyed soul Years active; 1969 to present Associated acts; Eric Burdon War Band The Animals Señor Soul ----------------- 1960s: Beginnings In 1962, Howard E. Scott and Harold Brown formed a group called The Creators in Long Beach, California. Within a few years, they had added Charles Miller, Morris "B. B." Dickerson and Lonnie Jordan to the lineup. Lee Oskar and Papa Dee Allen later joined as well. They all shared a love of diverse styles of music, which they had absorbed living in the racially-mixed Los Angeles ghettos. The Creators recorded several singles on Dore Records while working with Tjay Contrelli, a saxophonist from the band Love. In 1968, the Creators became Nightshift (named because Brown worked nights at a steel yard) and started performing with Deacon Jones, a football player and singer. The original War was conceived by record producer Jerry Goldstein ("My Boyfriend's Back", "Hang on Sloopy", "I Want Candy") and singer Eric Burdon (ex-lead singer of the British band the Animals). In 1969, Goldstein saw musicians who would eventually become War playing at the Rag Doll in North Hollywood, backing Deacon Jones, and he was attracted to the band's sound. Jordan claimed that the band's goal was to spread a message of brotherhood and harmony, using instruments and voices to speak out against racism, hunger, gangs, crimes, and turf Lowriders, and promote hope and the spirit of brotherhood.[citation needed] Eric Burdon and War began playing live shows to audiences throughout Southern California before entering into the studio to record their debut album Eric Burdon Declares "War". The album's best known track, "Spill the Wine", was a hit and launched the band's career. 1970s: Height of popularity Eric Burdon and War toured extensively across Europe and the United States. A reviewer from New Musical Express called War "the best live band I ever saw" after their first UK gig in London's Hyde Park.[citation needed] Their show at Ronnie Scott's Club in London on September 18, 1970 is historically notable for being the very last public performance for Jimi Hendrix, who joined them onstage for the last 35 minutes of Burdon & War's 2nd set; a day later he was dead. A second Eric Burdon and War album, a two-disc set titled The Black-Man's Burdon was released in 1970, before Burdon left the band in the middle of its European tour. They finished the tour without him and returned to record their first album as War. War (1971) met with only modest success, but later that year, the band released All Day Music which included the singles "All Day Music" and "Slippin' into Darkness". The latter single sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in June 1972.[2] In 1972 they released The World Is a Ghetto which was even more successful. Its second single, "The Cisco Kid" shipped gold,[citation needed] and the album attained the number one spot on Billboard, and was Billboard magazine's Album of the Year as the best-selling album of 1973. The next album, Deliver the Word (1973) contained the hits "Gypsy Man", and a studio version of "Me And Baby Brother" (previously issued as a live recording), which peaked at number 8 and 15 respectively on the Billboard chart. The album went on to sell nearly two million copies.[citation needed] The next album, Why Can't We Be Friends? was released in 1975. It included "Low Rider", and the title track, which were among the band's biggest hits. In 1976, War released a greatest hits record which contained one new song "Summer", which, as a single, went gold and peaked at number 7 on the Billboard chart. Also released that year were Love is All Around by Eric Burdon and War, containing mostly unreleased recordings from 1969 and 1970, and Platinum Jazz, a one-off album for jazz label Blue Note Records. The latter double album had cover art to match the greatest hits album, and was half new material and half compilation, focusing on (but not restricted to) instrumental music. The group continued to attain success with their next album, Galaxy (1977) whose title single was inspired by Star Wars. War's next project was a soundtrack album for the movie Youngblood in 1978. -------------

LP 417 / MAZE - Joy and Pain

Pris: 165,00 NOK
LP 417 - MAZE - 1980 UK - Vinyl; NM - Cover; NM m,orginal plast ----- Maze Band · mazemuze.com Maze are an American soul / quiet storm band, also known alternately as Maze Featuring Frankie Beverly and Frankie Beverly & Maze, was established in San Francisco, California in the early 1970s. Wikipedia Origin: Philadelphia, PA (1976) Members: Frankie Beverly, Jubu Smith, Carl Wheeler, Larry Kimpel, Calvin Napper, Roame Lowry, Vance Taylor Genres: Rhythm and blues, Soul music, Funk ------- Frankie Beverly started the group as Raw Soul in 1970. They recorded a couple of singles on the small Gregar label, but without any major hits. With a few personnel changes, a relocation from Philadelphia to the San Francisco Bay Area in California in 1971, and an introduction to Marvin Gaye, the group became an immediate success. Gaye took the group on the road with him as one of his opening acts, and in 1976, he suggested that they changed their name from Raw Soul to Maze. Maze signed a recording contract with Capitol Records in 1976, and released their debut album, Maze featuring Frankie Beverly, in 1977. From that album, the hit singles included "Happy Feelin's", "While I'm Alone", and "Lady of Magic", ultimately giving them their first gold record and earning Maze a devoted following. They also had success with the albums Golden Time of Day (1978), Inspiration (1979) and Joy and Pain (1980). Their next recording was Live in New Orleans, three quarters of which was recorded at the Saenger Theatre, on November 14–15, 1980. Three of those songs got into the US R&B chart, including "Running Away", "Before I Let Go", and "We Need Love To Live". By that time, the band had both a reputation in America and also enjoyed a following in the United Kingdom with promotional support from the British DJ Robbie Vincent. In May 1985, Maze sold out eight nights at the Hammersmith Odeon.[1] The group released their next album, Can't Stop the Love in March 1985, which featured the group's first number one R&B hit "Back In Stride." The Top 5 follow-up, "Too Many Games" was also featured on this album. The latter single also became the band's biggest hit in the UK, where it peaked at number 36 on the charts. In 1989, they signed with Warner Bros. and released the hit album Silky Soul, plus Back to Basics in 1993, and released the live DVD recording at London's Hammersmith Odeon in 1994. The two albums also attained gold disc status. They had another number one R&B success with "Can't Get Over You". In October 2004, "Twilight" appeared in the video game, Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, playing on funk radio station, Bounce FM . In 2009, a tribute to the hits of Maze was released. Called Silky Soul Music: An All Star Tribute to Maze Featuring Frankie Beverly, it included modern stars performing Maze's biggest hits with Maze acting as the backing band.[2] On September 2, 2011, their percussionist and background singer, McKinley "Bug" Williams, died of an apparent heart attack at a hotel in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Maze continues to tour around the United States as well as Europe to this day. Every year they are the closing act for the Essence Music Festival.

LP 428 / GORDON LIGJHTFOOT - Summertime Dream

Pris: 165,00 NOK
LP 428 - Gordon Lightfoot 1976 USA / Vin; EX+ - Cover; EX -------------- Birth name Gordon Meredith Lightfoot, Jr. Born November 17, 1938 (age 76) Orillia, Ontario, Canada Genres Folk, folk rock, country, pop Occupation(s) Musician, singer-songwriter Instruments Vocals, guitar, piano Years active 1958–present ---------- Gordon Meredith Lightfoot, Jr. CC OOnt (born November 17, 1938) is a Canadian singer-songwriter who achieved international success in folk, folk-rock, and country music, and has been credited for helping define the folk-pop sound of the 1960s and 1970s.[1] He has been referred to as Canada's greatest songwriter[2] and internationally as a folk-rock legend.[3][4] Lightfoot's songs, including "For Lovin' Me", "Early Morning Rain", "Steel Rail Blues", "Ribbon of Darkness"—a number one hit on the U.S. country chart[5] with Marty Robbins's cover in 1965— and the 1967 Detroit riot-generated "Black Day in July" brought him international recognition in the 1960s. He experienced chart success in Canada with his own recordings, beginning in 1962 with the #3 hit "(Remember Me) I'm the One". Lightfoot's recordings then made an impact on the international music charts as well in the 1970s, with songs such as "If You Could Read My Mind" (1970) (#5 on the US chart), "Sundown" (1974), "Carefree Highway" (1974), "Rainy Day People" (1975), all reaching #1, and "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" (1976) (#2).[6] Some of Lightfoot's albums have achieved gold and multi-platinum status internationally. His songs have been recorded by some of the world's most renowned recording artists, including Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Hank Williams Jr., The Kingston Trio, Marty Robbins, George Hamilton IV, Jerry Lee Lewis, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Judy Collins, Barbra Streisand, Johnny Mathis, Eddie Albert, Herb Alpert, Viola Wills, Richie Havens, The Replacements, Harry Belafonte, Tony Rice, Sandy Denny (with Fotheringay), The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, Scott Walker, Sarah McLachlan, Eric Clapton, Jim Croce, John Mellencamp, Jack Jones, Bobby Vee, Blue Rodeo, The Tragically Hip, Roger Whittaker, Toby Keith, Peter, Paul and Mary, Glen Campbell, Anne Murray, Waylon Jennings, The Irish Rovers, Nico, Olivia Newton-John and Paul Weller.[7] Robbie Robertson of The Band declared that Lightfoot was one of his "favourite Canadian songwriters and is absolutely a national treasure."[8] Bob Dylan, also a Lightfoot fan, called him one of his favourite songwriters, and in an often-quoted tribute, Dylan observed that when he heard a Gordon Lightfoot song he wished "it would last forever."[9] Lightfoot was a featured musical performer at the opening ceremonies of the 1988 Winter Olympic Games in Calgary, Alberta. He received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree (arts) in 1979 and the Companion of the Order of Canada—Canada's highest civilian honor—in 2003.[10][11] In November 1997, Lightfoot was awarded the Governor General's Performing Arts Award, Canada's highest honour in the performing arts.[12] On February 6, 2012, Lightfoot was presented with the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. In June of that same year he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.[13][14] On June 6, 2015, Lightfoot received an honorary doctorate of music in his hometown of Orillia from Lakehead University.

LP 431 / LOU RAWLS - Lou Rawls and Strings

Pris: 145,00 NOK
LP 431 - Lou Rawls 1965 USA / Vin; VG ( hairlines ) - Cover; VG+ -------------- Louis Allen "Lou" Rawls (December 1, 1933 – January 6, 2006) was an American recording artist, voice actor, songwriter, and record producer. He is best known for his singing ability: Frank Sinatra once said that Rawls had "the classiest singing and silkiest chops in the singing game".[1] Rawls released more than 60 albums, sold more than 40 million records,[2] and had numerous charting singles, most notably his song "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine". He worked as a television, motion picture, and voice actor. He was also a three-time Grammy-winner, all for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance. ----- Rawls was born in Chicago on December 1, 1933, and raised by his grandmother in the Ida B. Wells projects on the city's South Side. He began singing in the Greater Mount Olive Baptist Church choir at the age of seven and later sang with local groups through which he met future music stars Sam Cooke, who was nearly three years older than Rawls, and Curtis Mayfield.[3] After graduating from Chicago's Dunbar Vocational High School, he sang briefly with Cooke in the Teenage Kings of Harmony, a local gospel group, and then with the Holy Wonders. In 1951, Rawls replaced Cooke in the Highway QC's after Cooke departed to join The Soul Stirrers in Los Angeles. Rawls was soon recruited by the Chosen Gospel Singers and moved to Los Angeles, where he subsequently joined the Pilgrim Travelers.[4] In 1955, Rawls enlisted in the United States Army as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division. He left the "All-Americans" three years later as a sergeant and rejoined the Pilgrim Travelers (then known as the Travelers). In 1958, while touring the South with the Travelers and Sam Cooke, Rawls was in a serious car crash. Rawls was pronounced dead before arriving at the hospital, where he stayed in a coma for five and a half days. It took him months to regain his memory, and a year to fully recuperate. Rawls considered the event to be life-changing.[4] Alongside Dick Clark as master of ceremonies, Rawls was recovered enough by 1959 to be able to perform at the Hollywood Bowl. He was signed to Capitol Records in 1962, the same year he sang the soulful background vocals on the Sam Cooke recording of "Bring It On Home to Me" and "That's Where It's At," both written by Cooke. Rawls himself charted with a cover of "Bring It On Home to Me" in 1970 (with the title shortened to "Bring It On Home"). Soul is truth, ... no matter where it comes from, no matter how it is presented Lou Rawls, 1968 Pop Chronicles interview[5] Rawls' first Capitol solo release was Stormy Monday (a.k.a. I'd Rather Drink Muddy Water), a jazz album with Les McCann in 1962. The next two Capitol releases did well and used Onzy Matthews as the musical director along with a 17-piece big band; both these albums (Black and Blue, Tobacco Road) charted with Billboard and helped to propel him into the national spotlight as a recording artist. Though his 1966 album Live! went gold, Rawls would not have a star-making hit until he made a proper soul album, appropriately named Soulin', later that same year. The album contained his first R&B #1 single, "Love Is a Hurtin' Thing". In 1967 Rawls won his first Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance, for the single "Dead End Street." In 1967, Rawls also performed at the first evening of the Monterey International Pop Music Festival.[6] Rawls performing with Frank Gorshin in 1977 In 1969, the singer was co-host of NBC's summer replacement series for the Dean Martin Show along with Martin's daughter, singer Gail Martin. After leaving Capitol in 1971, Rawls joined MGM, at which juncture he released his Grammy-winning single "Natural Man" written for him by comedian Sandy Baron and singer Bobby Hebb. He had a brief stint with Bell Records in 1974, where he recorded a cover of Hall & Oates' "She's Gone." In 1976, Rawls signed with Philadelphia International Records, where he had his greatest album success with the million-selling All Things in Time. The album produced his most successful single, "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine", which topped the R&B and Adult Contemporary charts and went to number two on the pop side, becoming Rawls' only certified million-selling single in the process. Subsequent albums, such as 1977's When You Hear Lou, You've Heard It All yielded such hit singles as "Lady Love". Other releases in the 1970s included the classic album Sit Down And Talk To Me. Rawls' 1977 Grammy Awards performance of "You'll Never Find" was disrupted by a coughing fit. In 1982, Rawls received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He sang the lyrics to WGN-TV's 1983 "Chicago's Very Own" ad campaign, a slogan that the station still uses to this day. On January 19, 1985, he sang Wind Beneath My Wings at the nationally-televised 50th Presidential Inaugural Gala the day before the second inauguration of Ronald Reagan. He was introduced by Patricia Neal. In 1989, he performed vocals for "The Music and Heroes of America" segment in the animated television miniseries This is America, Charlie Brown.

LP 442 / JAMES BROWN - Hell

Pris: 185,00 NOK
LP 442 - James Brown 1974 USA DBL.LP - Vinyl; VG/VG+ / Cover; VG -------------------- Birth name James Joseph Brown Born May 3, 1933 Barnwell, South Carolina, United States Origin Toccoa, Georgia Died December 25, 2006 (aged 73) Atlanta, Georgia Genres Funk, soul, R&B Occupation(s) Singer, producer, dancer, bandleader Instruments Vocals, drums, percussion, organ, keyboards Years active 1954–1988; 1991-2006 Labels Federal, King, Dade, Try Me, Smash, People, Polydor, Scotti Bros. Associated acts The Famous Flames, The J.B.'s, The Dapps, Bobby Byrd, The Soul Generals, Lyn Collins, Bobby Bennett, Bootsy Collins James Joseph Brown[1] (May 3, 1933 – December 25, 2006) was an American singer and dancer. The founding father of funk music and a major figure of 20th-century popular music and dance, he is often referred to as "The Godfather of Soul". In a career that spanned six decades, Brown influenced the development of several music genres.[2] Brown began his career as a gospel singer in Toccoa, Georgia. Joining an R&B vocal group called the Avons that later evolved to become The Flames, Brown served as the group's lead singer.[3][4] First coming to national public attention in the late 1950s as a member of the singing group The Famous Flames with the hit ballads "Please, Please, Please" and "Try Me", Brown built a reputation as a tireless live performer with the Famous Flames and his backing band, sometimes known as the James Brown Band or the James Brown Orchestra. Brown's success peaked in the 1960s with the live album Live at the Apollo and hit singles such as "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag", "I Got You (I Feel Good)" and "It's a Man's Man's Man's World". During the late 1960s, Brown moved from a continuum of blues and gospel-based forms and styles to a profoundly "Africanized" approach to music-making that influenced the development of funk music.[5] By the early 1970s, Brown had fully established the funk sound after the formation of The J.B.'s with records such as "Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine" and "The Payback". Brown also became notable for songs of social commentary, including the 1968 hit "Say It Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud". Brown continued to perform and record until his death in 2006 from congestive heart failure. Brown recorded 16 singles that peaked at number-one on the Billboard R&B charts.[6] Brown also holds the record for the most singles listed on the Billboard Hot 100 chart which did not reach number-one.[7][8] Brown has been honored by many institutions including inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Songwriters Hall of Fame.[9] In Joel Whitburn's analysis of the Billboard R&B charts from 1942 to 2010, James Brown is ranked as number one in The Top 500 Artists.[10] Brown is ranked seventh on the music magazine Rolling Stone's list of its 100 greatest artists of all time. Rolling Stone has also cited Brown as the most sampled artist of all time.[11]

LP 444 / GARY TOMS EMPIRE - 7-6-5-4-3-2-1- Blo

Pris: 165,00 NOK
LP 444 - Gary Toms Empire - 1975 USA - FOC Cov; EX - Vin; EX ---------- Funky Soul ----------- The funkydisco era, like many pop aberrations, produced its fair share of one-hit wonders, a category that New York City's Gary Toms Empire fit into like a well-oiled cog. The band found fleeting fame in 1975 with the infectious jam "7-6-5-4-3-2-1 (Blow Your Whistle)." The single sold over 40,000 copies in N.Y.C. during its first week alone, and has since found its way onto numerous compilations and DJ playlists. 7-6-5-4-3-2-1 Blow Your Whistle: The Best of Gary Toms Empire features that hit, as well as follow-up singles "Slow & Funky" and "Feel That Funky Groove," both of which were decent enough disco floor-burners that failed to connect with listeners on the same level as "Blow Your Whistle." Also included is the group's horrific 1976 cover of the Beatles' "Drive My Car," part of a promotional 12" for the Pickwick label that included the songs "Stand Up and Shout" and "Party Hardy."

LP 651 / GIANTS - Same

Pris: 245,00 NOK
LP 651 - Giants 1978 USA / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX (wear) Denne LP er laget spesielt for Danmark, står også preget i cover høyre side opp. Vanskelig å få det med på scanner. Baksiden står det; Export Only - For Sale Ouside Continental United States Only. SJELDEN VINYL ! -------- Giants; ‎– Giants Label: MCA Records ‎– MCA-3188, Far Out Productions ‎– MCA-3188 Format: Vinyl, LP, Album Country: Usa Released: 1978 Genre: Jazz, Funk / Soul Style: Fusion, Downtempo, Funk -------------------