OD 151 / LED ZEPPELIN - The Song Remains The S

Pris: 295,00 NOK
OD 151 - Led Zeppelin DBL LP 1976 USA - Vinyl; EX- - Cover; EX FOC LP Swan Song SS 2-201 --------------- Tracklist Rock And Roll 4:03 Celebration Day 3:43 The Song Remains The Same 6:00 Rain Song 8:24 Dazed And Confused 26:53 No Quarter 12:30 Stairway To Heaven 10:58 Moby Dick 12:47 Whole Lotta Love 14:24 ---------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s ----------- In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down.[6] Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively.[7] Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[8] The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.[9] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire.[10] They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle.[11] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham.[12] Jones inquired about the vacant position at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[13][nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.[15] A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern. A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg, similar to that used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[16] Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately".[17] Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P.J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was th

OD 147 / LED ZEPPELIN - Coda

Pris: 135,00 NOK
OD 147 - Led Zeppelin - 1982 USA press / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX FOC ----------------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s ----------- In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down.[6] Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively.[7] Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[8] The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.[9] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire.[10] They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle.[11] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham.[12] Jones inquired about the vacant position at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[13][nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.[15] A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern. A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg, similar to that used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[16] Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately".[17] Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P.J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was the first studio track to feature all four future members of Led Zeppelin.[18] The band completed the Scandinavian tour as the New Yardbirds, playing together for the first time in front of a live audience at Gladsaxe Teen Clubs in Gladsaxe,

OD 150 / LED ZEPPELIN - Zoso

Pris: 345,00 NOK
OD 150 - Led Zeppelin Zoso - 1971 DE - Vinyl; EX+ - Cover; EX Atlantic; 50 008 ----------------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s ----------- In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down.[6] Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively.[7] Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[8] The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.[9] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire.[10] They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle.[11] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham.[12] Jones inquired about the vacant position at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[13][nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.[15] A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern. A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg, similar to that used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[16] Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately".[17] Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P.J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was the first studio track to feature all four future members of Led Zeppelin.[18] The band completed the Scandinavian tour as the New Yardbirds, playing together for the first time in front of a live audience at Gladsaxe Teen Clubs in G

OD 149 / LED ZEPPELIN - 2

Pris: 385,00 NOK
OD 149 - Led Zeppelin 2 - 1971 UK - Vinyl; EX ( m,hairlines ) - Cover; EX FOC ----------------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s ----------- In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down.[6] Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively.[7] Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[8] The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.[9] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire.[10] They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle.[11] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham.[12] Jones inquired about the vacant position at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[13][nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.[15] A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern. A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg, similar to that used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[16] Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately".[17] Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P.J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was the first studio track to feature all four future members of Led Zeppelin.[18] The band completed the Scandinavian tour as the New Yardbirds, playing together for the first time in front of a live audience at Gladsaxe Teen Clubs in Gl

OD 148 / LED ZEPPELIN - Same - 1 press UK

Pris: 995,00 NOK
OD 148 - Led Zeppelin - 1 utgave UK 1969 - Plum label og megasjelden / høy verdi Vinyl; VG ( har hairlines & riper ) - Cover; VG+ ( litt wear) - Atlantic; 588 171 - Selges rimelig p.g.a noe støy når den spilles ! ------------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s ----------- In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down.[6] Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively.[7] Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[8] The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.[9] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire.[10] They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle.[11] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham.[12] Jones inquired about the vacant position at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[13][nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.[15] A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern. A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg, similar to that used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[16] Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately".[17] Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P.J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was the first studio track to feature all four future members of Led Zeppelin.[18] The band completed the Scand

OD 152 / LED ZEPPELIN - Houses Of The Holy

Pris: 395,00 NOK
OD 152 - Led Zeppelin - 1973 DE press - Vinyl; EX+ - Cover; EX FOC Atlantic ATL 50 014 -------------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s ----------- In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down.[6] Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively.[7] Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[8] The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.[9] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire.[10] They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle.[11] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham.[12] Jones inquired about the vacant position at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[13][nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.[15] A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern. A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg, similar to that used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[16] Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately".[17] Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P.J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was the first studio track to feature all four future members of Led Zeppelin.[18] The band completed the Scandinavian tour as the New Yardbirds, playing together for the first time in front of a live audience at Gladsaxe Teen Club

LP 1081 / LED ZEPPELIN - 1

Pris: 395,00 NOK
LP 1081 - Led Zeppelin 1969 USA - SD-19126 Vinyl; EX+ - over; EX+ --------------------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s. ---------- les mer info på Wikipedia !

OD 153 / LED ZEPPELIN - Presence

Pris: 275,00 NOK
OD 153 - Led Zeppelin 1976 USA press - Vinyl; EX - Cover; EX FOC Swan Song SS 8416 0698 --------------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s ----------- In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down.[6] Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively.[7] Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[8] The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.[9] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire.[10] They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle.[11] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham.[12] Jones inquired about the vacant position at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[13][nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.[15] A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern. A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg, similar to that used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[16] Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately".[17] Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P.J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was the first studio track to feature all four future members of Led Zeppelin.[18] The band completed the Scandinavian tour as the New Yardbirds, playing together for the first time in front of a live audience at Gladsaxe Teen

OD 154 / LED ZEPPELIN - In Through The Out Doo

Pris: 185,00 NOK
OD 154 - Led Zeppelin 1979 DE - Vinyl; EX- ( hairlines ) - Cover; EX Swan Song K 59 410 ----------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ---------------------- Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music and blues. After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), their untitled fourth album (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity. Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums. Led Zeppelin are widely considered one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the second-best-selling band in the United States.[1] Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot.[2] Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time",[3] "the biggest band of the Seventies",[3] and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history".[4] They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s ----------- In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down.[6] Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively.[7] Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project.[8] The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.[9] The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire.[10] They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle.[11] Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham.[12] Jones inquired about the vacant position at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[13][nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.[15] A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern. A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg, similar to that used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London.[16] Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play," Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately".[17] Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P.J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was the first studio track to feature all four future members of Led Zeppelin.[18] The band completed the Scandinavian tour as the New Yardbirds, playing together for the first time in front of a live audience at Gladsaxe Teen Clubs i

LP 1082 / LED ZEPPELIN - 3

Pris: 375,00 NOK
LP 1082 - Led Zeppelin 1970 USA Vinyl; EX- (hairliner ) - Cover; EX- ( waer ) FOC album ---------------------- Origin London, England Genres Hard rock blues rock folk rock heavy metal Years active 1968–80 (reunions: 1985, 1988, 1995, 2007) Labels Atlantic Swan Song Associated acts The Yardbirds Band of Joy the Firm the Honeydrippers Page and Plant ------------- Hard rock is a loosely defined subgenre of rock music which began in the mid-1960s, with the garage, psychedelic and blues rock movements. It is typified by a heavy use of aggressive vocals, distorted electric guitars, bass guitar, drums, and often accompanied with pianos and keyboards. Hard rock developed into a major form of popular music in the 1970s, with bands such as Led Zeppelin, The Who, Deep Purple, Aerosmith, AC/DC and Van Halen. During the 1980s, some hard rock bands moved away from their hard rock roots and more towards pop rock,[1][2] while others began to return to a hard rock sound.[3] Established bands made a comeback in the mid-1980s and it reached a commercial peak in the 1980s, with glam metal bands like Bon Jovi and Def Leppard and the rawer sounds of Guns N' Roses, which followed up with great success in the later part of that decade. Hard rock began losing popularity with the commercial success of grunge and later Britpop in the 1990s. Despite this, many post-grunge bands adopted a hard rock sound and in the 2000s there came a renewed interest in established bands, attempts at a revival, and new hard rock bands that emerged from the garage rock and post-punk revival scenes. In the 2000s, only a few hard rock bands from the 1970s and 1980s managed to sustain highly successful recording careers. ---------- les mer info på Wikipedia !

LP-2248 / LED ZEPPELIN - Same - Norsk

Pris: 595,00 NOK
LP-2248 / LED ZEPPELIN - Same - 1969 NORSK UTGAVE Vinyl; NM / Cover; EX