LP 642 / BADFINGER - Ass

Pris: 235,00 NOK
LP 642 - Badfinger 1973 USA / Vinyl; EX+ - Cover; EX- (noe wear ) ( Apple Press Usa ) ----------------- Also known as; The Iveys (1961 – 69) Origin from; Swansea, Wales; Liverpool, England Genres; Rock, power pop Years active; 1969 – 75, 1978 – 84 ---------------------------- Badfinger were a British rock band that, in their most prolific lineup, consisted of Pete Ham, Mike Gibbins, Tom Evans and Joey Molland. The band evolved from an earlier group called The Iveys that was formed in 1961 by Ham, Ron Griffiths and David "Dai" Jenkins in Swansea, Wales. They were the first group signed by the Beatles' Apple label in 1968 as The Iveys. In 1969, Griffiths left and was replaced by Molland, and the band renamed themselves Badfinger. In 1970, the band engaged American businessman Stan Polley to manage their commercial affairs. Over the next five years the band recorded several albums for Apple and toured extensively, before they became embroiled in the chaos of Apple Records' dissolution. Badfinger had four consecutive worldwide hits from 1970 to 1972: "Come and Get It" (written and produced by Paul McCartney), "No Matter What", "Day After Day" (produced by George Harrison) and "Baby Blue". In 2013, "Baby Blue" made a resurgence onto the "Hot Rock Songs" Billboard 100 chart at number 14, due to its featuring at the end of the series finale of the hit TV show Breaking Bad.[1] Their song "Without You" has been covered many times, including a Billboard number one hit for Harry Nilsson. They signed to Warner Bros., but Polley's financial machinations resulted in a lawsuit by Warner over missing escrow account money. Warner's consequent withdrawal from market of the 1974 album, Wish You Were Here (seven weeks after its release), cut off the band's income. Three days before his 28th birthday, on 24 April 1975, Ham committed suicide by hanging himself, leaving a note that included damning comments about Polley. Over the next three years, surviving members struggled to rebuild their personal and professional lives against a backdrop of lawsuits. The albums Airwaves (1979) and Say No More (1981) floundered, as Molland and Evans see-sawed between cooperation and struggle in attempts to revive and capitalise on the Badfinger legacy. Having seen Ham's body after Ham's wife had called him, Evans reportedly never got over his friend's suicide, and was quoted as saying in darker moments, "I wanna be where he is."[2] On 19 November 1983, Evans also took his own life by hanging. ------------- Studio albums As The Iveys: Year Album US Top 200 1969 Maybe Tomorrow – As Badfinger: Year Album 1970 Magic Christian Music No Dice 1971 Straight Up 1973 Ass 1974 Badfinger Wish You Were Here 1979 Airwaves 1981 Say No More 2000 Head First ------------- les mer på Wikipedia.....

LP 432 / BADFINGER - Airwaves

Pris: 165,00 NOK
LP 432 - Badfinger 1979 USA / Vin; NM- - Cov; NM- m,org.plast ------------ Also known as; The Iveys ( 1961–69 ) Origin from; Swansea, Wales; Liverpool, England --- Genres; Rock power pop --- Years active 1969–75, 1978–84 Labels Apple, Warner Brothers, Elektra Associated acts The Dodgers, Natural Gas, The Beatles, David Garrick ------ Badfinger were a British rock band that, in their most prolific lineup, consisted of Pete Ham, Mike Gibbins, Tom Evans and Joey Molland. The band evolved from an earlier group called The Iveys that was formed in 1961 by Ham, Ron Griffiths and David "Dai" Jenkins in Swansea, Wales. They were the first group signed by the Beatles' Apple label in 1968 as The Iveys. In 1969, Griffiths left and was replaced by Molland, and the band renamed themselves Badfinger. In 1970, the band engaged American businessman Stan Polley to manage their commercial affairs. Over the next five years the band recorded several albums for Apple and toured extensively, before they became embroiled in the chaos of Apple Records' dissolution. Badfinger had four consecutive worldwide hits from 1970 to 1972: "Come and Get It" (written and produced by Paul McCartney), "No Matter What", "Day After Day" (produced by George Harrison) and "Baby Blue". In 2013, "Baby Blue" made a resurgence onto the "Hot Rock Songs" Billboard 100 chart at number 14, due to its featuring at the end of the series finale of the hit TV show Breaking Bad.[1] Their song "Without You" has been covered many times, including a Billboard number one hit for Harry Nilsson. They signed to Warner Bros., but Polley's financial machinations resulted in a lawsuit by Warner over missing escrow account money. Warner's consequent withdrawal from market of the 1974 album, Wish You Were Here (seven weeks after its release), cut off the band's income. Three days before his 28th birthday, on 24 April 1975, Ham committed suicide by hanging himself, leaving a note that included damning comments about Polley. Over the next three years, surviving members struggled to rebuild their personal and professional lives against a backdrop of lawsuits. The albums Airwaves (1979) and Say No More (1981) floundered, as Molland and Evans see-sawed between cooperation and struggle in attempts to revive and capitalise on the Badfinger legacy. Having seen Ham's body after Ham's wife had called him, Evans reportedly never got over his friend's suicide, and was quoted as saying in darker moments, "I wanna be where he is."[2] On 19 November 1983, Evans also took his own life by hanging. ------------- Early days The Iveys formed in 1961 in Swansea from The Panthers, whose line-up comprised "Ham" (lead guitar) (b. Peter William Ham, 27 April 1947, Townhill, Swansea, d. 23 April 1975), "Griffiths" (bass guitar) (b. Ronald Llewellyn Griffiths, 2 October 1946, Swansea), David "Dai" Jenkins (rhythm guitar) (b. David Owen Jenkins, 30 October 1945, Swansea), and Roy Anderson (drums). Playing under various names including The Black Velvets and the Wild Ones,[3] by 1964 they settled on The Iveys, after a street in Swansea called Ivey Place. In March 1965, drummer "Gibbins" (b. Michael George Gibbins, 12 March 1949, Swansea, d. 4 October 2005) joined The Iveys. The group secured concerts around Swansea area, opening for prominent British groups such as the Spencer Davis Group, The Who, The Moody Blues and The Yardbirds. By June 1966, Bill Collins (the father of actor Lewis Collins had started to manage the group. In December 1966 the entire group moved into Collins' home at 7 Park Avenue, Golders Green, London, sharing space with an act called The Mojos.The house was terminally overcrowded, so the only place to find any privacy was in a room equipped with a two-track recording machine. The group performed a wide range of cover tunes on the London circuit,[8] from Motown, blues, soul to Top 40, psychedelic pop, and Beatles' hits, which garnered interest from record labels. Ray Davies of The Kinks auditioned to produce them, recording three of their songs at a 4-track demo studio in London's Old Kent Road on 15 January 1967: "Taxi" and "Sausage And Eggs", songs by Ham; and Griffiths' "I Believe in You Girl". On 8 December 1966, Collins and the group signed a five-year contract giving Collins a 20% share of net receipts, the same as the individual group members, but only after managerial expenses had been deducted. Collins said at the time, "Look, I can't promise you lads anything, except blood, sweat and tears". The group performed occasional concerts backing David Garrick, while performing as The Iveys across the United Kingdom throughout the rest of the decade. In August 1967, Jenkins was asked to leave the group, and was replaced by Liverpudlian guitarist Evans, of Them Calderstones (b. Thomas Evans Jr., 5 June 1947, Liverpool, d. 19 November 1983). Jenkins' departure was remembered by Griffiths as being "politely asked if he would step down", as Jenkins seemed more interested in girls than the music. Signing to Apple After receiving an invitation from Collins, Beatles' roadie/assistant Mal Evans and Apple Records' A&R head Peter Asher saw them perform at the Marquee Club, London, on 25 January 1968. Afterward, Evans consistently pushed their demo tapes to every Beatle until he gained approval from all four to sign the group.[15] The demos were accomplished using a mono "sound-on-sound" tape recorder: two individual tracks bouncing each overdub on top of the last. Mal Evans' support ultimately led to their signing with Apple on 23 July 1968 – the first non-Beatle recording artists on the label. Each of The Iveys' members were also signed to Apple Corps' publishing contracts.The Iveys' early sessions for Apple were produced by either Tony Visconti or Evans. The group's first single, "Maybe Tomorrow", produced by Visconti, was released worldwide on 15 November 1968. It reached the Top Ten in several European countries and Japan, but only number 67