OD-190 / KING CRIMSON - Three Of A Perfect Pai

Pris: 245,00 NOK
OD-190 - KING CRIMSON 1984 NL - Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX -------------------------- Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Island Records.

OD-191 / KING CRIMSON - USA

Pris: 185,00 NOK
LP OD-191 - King Crimson 1975 USA - Vinyl; EX- ( hairlines) / Cover; EX- ( wear ) ------------ Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Island Records. Fripp would later descri

OD-189 / KING CRIMSON - Discipline

Pris: 245,00 NOK
OD-189 - KING CRIMSON 1981 USA - VINYL: NM - Cover: EX -------------------- Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Island Records. Fripp would later descri

OD-188 / KING CRIMSON - The Young Persons Guide

Pris: 445,00 NOK
OD-188 - KING CRIMSON - Prod; 15.11.1975 1975 UK - Vinyl; NM - Cover EX ( FOC ) / Sjelden dbl lp ! ---------------------------- Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Isl

OD-187 / KING CRIMSON - Starless And Bible Bla

Pris: 485,00 NOK
OD-187 - KING KRIMSON 1974 JAPAN - sjelden lp ! / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX (FOC) ------------------- Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Island Records.

OD-186 / KING CRIMSON - In The Court Of The King

Pris: 595,00 NOK
OD-186 - KING CRIMSON 1969 USA Orginal 1.ste utgivelse - Vinyl; EX+ - Cover; EX (FOC) ----------------------- Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Island Records.

LP-55 / KING CRIMSON - Beat

Pris: 235,00 NOK
LP-55 / KING CRIMSON 1982 UK / Vinyl; NM - Cover; EX ( noe hyllewear ) ---------------- Genres; Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active; 1968 - 1974, 1981 - 1984, 1994 - 1997, 2000 - 2004, 2007 - 2009, 2013 - present ---------------- Studio uk albums; In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Island Records.

LP 1028 / KING CRIMSON - Starless and Bible bl

Pris: 195,00 NOK
KING CRIMSON - 1974 USA / Vinyl; EX+ m,navn - FOC Cover; VG+ ( wear+bunnsplitt ) ------------ Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Island Records.

LP 1027 / KING CRIMSON - The Younf Person`s Gu

Pris: 265,00 NOK
KING CRIMSON - 1975 UK / DBL LP FOC / Vinyl: EX+ x 2 m,lite navn - Cover; EX- ( wear ) Det følger med orginalt innleggshefte ! ------- Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969

OD-104 / KING CRIMSON - Beat

Pris: 245,00 NOK
OD-104 / KING CRIMSON 1982 USA Vinyl; EX+ - Cover; EX+ ---------------- Genres; Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active; 1968 - 1974, 1981 - 1984, 1994 - 1997, 2000 - 2004, 2007 - 2009, 2013 - present ---------------- Studio uk albums; In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of the Crimson King, was released in October 1969 on Island Records.in from; London, England Genres; Heavy metal, hard rock, progressive rock. Y

LP-2054 / KING CRIMSON - In The Court Of The King

Pris: 495,00 NOK
LP-2054 / KING CRIMSON - In The Court Of The King Vinyl: NM Cover: EX- ( musespist hjørne :-) ) 1969 USA Orginal 1.ste utgivelse - Vinyl; EX+ - Cover; EX (FOC) ----------------------- Genres Progressive rock, experimental rock, jazz fusion, new wave ,Psychedelic,rock, heavy metal . Years active 1968-1974, 1981-1984, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2007-2009, 2013-present ---------------- Studio uk albums In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) Lizard (1970) Islands (1971) Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) Starless and Bible Black (1974) Red (1974) Discipline (1981) Beat (1982) Three of a Perfect Pair (1984) THRAK (1995) The ConstruKction of Light (2000) The Power to Believe (2003) ---------------- Origins "The Giles Brothers were looking for a singing organist. I was a non-singing guitar player. After 30 days of recording and playing with them I asked if I got the job or not – joking like, you know? And Michael Giles rolled a cigarette and said, very slowly, 'Well, let's not be in too much of a hurry to commit ourselves, shall we?' I still don't know if I ever got the job." Robert Fripp on signing up with Michael and Peter Giles[5] In August 1967, brothers Michael Giles (drums) and Peter Giles (bass) who had been professional musicians in various jobbing bands since their mid-teens in Dorset, advertised for a singing organist to join their new project.[6] Fellow Dorset musician Robert Fripp – a guitarist who did not sing – responded and the trio formed the band Giles, Giles and Fripp. Based on a format of eccentric pop songs and complex instrumentals, the band recorded several unsuccessful singles and one album, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp.[3] The band hovered on the edge of success, with several radio sessions and a television appearance, but never scored the hit that would have been crucial for a commercial breakthrough. The album was no more of a success than the singles, and was even disparaged by Keith Moon of The Who in a magazine review.[3] Attempting to expand their sound, Giles, Giles and Fripp then recruited the multi-instrumentalist Ian McDonald on keyboards, reeds and woodwinds. McDonald brought along his then-girlfriend, the former Fairport Convention singer Judy Dyble, whose tenure with the group was brief and ended at the same time as her romantic split with McDonald (she would later resurface in Trader Horne).[3][7] More significantly, McDonald brought in lyricist, roadie and art strategist Peter Sinfield, with whom he had been writing songs – a partnership initiated when McDonald had said to Sinfield, regarding his 1968 band Creation, "Peter, I have to tell you that your band is hopeless, but you write some great words. Would you like to get together on a couple of songs?"[8] One of the first songs McDonald and Sinfield wrote together was "The Court of the Crimson King".[citation needed] Fripp, meanwhile, had seen the band 1-2-3 (later known as Clouds) at the Marquee. This band would later inspire some of Crimson's penchant for classical melodies and jazz-like improvisation.[9] Feeling that he no longer wished to pursue Peter Giles' more whimsical pop style, Fripp recommended his friend Greg Lake, a singer and guitarist, for recruitment into the band, with the suggestion that Lake should replace either him or Peter Giles.[7] Although Peter Giles would later sardonically describe this as one of Fripp's "cute political moves",[7] he himself had become disillusioned with Giles, Giles and Fripp's failure to break through, and stepped down to be replaced by Lake as the band's bass player, singer and frontman. At this point, the band morphed into what would become King Crimson.[3] Line-up 1 (1968–1969) The first incarnation of King Crimson was formed in London on 30 November 1968 and first rehearsed on 13 January 1969.[3][10] The band name was coined by lyricist Peter Sinfield, though it is not meant to be a synonym for Beelzebub, prince of demons.[11] According to Fripp, Beelzebub would be an anglicised form of the Arabic phrase "B'il Sabab", meaning "the man with an aim".[12] Historically and etymologically, a "crimson king" was any monarch during whose reign there was civil unrest and copious bloodshed; the album debuted at the height of world-wide opposition to the military involvement of the United States in Southeast Asia. At this point, Ian McDonald was King Crimson's main composer, albeit with significant contributions from Lake and Fripp, while Sinfield not only wrote all the lyrics but designed and operated the band's revolutionary stage lighting, and was therefore credited with "sounds and visions". McDonald suggested the new band purchase a Mellotron (the first example of the band's persistent involvement with music technology) and they began using it to create an orchestral rock sound, inspired by The Moody Blues.[13] Peter Sinfield, interviewed for Prog Rock Britannia: An Observation in Three Movements, described Crimson thus: "[W]e had an Ethos in Crimson... we just refused to play anything that sounded anything like a Tin Pan Alley record. If it sounded at all popular, it was out. So it had to be complicated, it had to be more expansive chords, it had to have strange influences. If it sounded, like, too simple, we'd make it more complicated, we'd play it in 7/8 or 5/8, just to show off".[4] "The Court of the Crimson King" (1969) Menu 0:00 37 second sample from King Crimson's "The Court of the Crimson King", demonstrating the sound of the first incarnation of the band, with its classically influenced style and use of the Mellotron instrument. Problems playing this file? See media help. King Crimson made their live debut on 9 April 1969,[10] and made a breakthrough by playing the Rolling Stones free concert at Hyde Park, London in July 1969 before an estimated 500,000 people.[3] In the Court of the Crimson King The band's debut album, In the Court of