LP 1033 / DOORS - The Soft Parade

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LP 1033 - The Doors 1977 DE repress Vinyl; EX+ - Cover; EX ( wear ) ---------------------- Origin from; Los Angeles, California, U.S. Genres ; Psychedelic rock[1] acid rock[2] blues rock[3] hard rock[4] Years active; 1965 – 73 - (Reunions: 1978, 1993, 1997, 2000, 2011) Labels ; Elektra - Rhino ----------------- Discography Main article: The Doors discography The Doors (1967) Strange Days (1967) Waiting for the Sun (1968) The Soft Parade (1969) Morrison Hotel (1970) L.A. Woman (1971) Other Voices (1971) Full Circle (1972) An American Prayer (1978) --------------- 1965–68 Origins and Information The Doors logo, designed by an Elektra Records assistant, first appeared on their 1967 debut album. The origins of the Doors began with a meeting between acquaintances Jim Morrison and Ray Manzarek, both of whom had attended the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, on Venice Beach in July 1965. Morrison told Manzarek he had been writing songs (Morrison said "I was taking notes at a fantastic rock'n'roll concert going on in my head") and with Manzarek's encouragement sang "Moonlight Drive". The members came from a varied musical background from jazz, rock, blues, and folk idioms.[20] Keyboardist Manzarek was in a band called Rick & the Ravens with his brothers Rick and Jim, while drummer John Densmore was playing with the Psychedelic Rangers and knew Manzarek from meditation classes.[21] In August, Densmore joined the group, which had been renamed the Doors, and the five (Morrison having previously joined the band), along with bass player Patty Sullivan (later credited using her married name Patricia Hansen in the 1997 box CD release) recorded a six-song demo in September 1965. This has circulated widely since then as a bootleg recording. The band took their name from the title of Aldous Huxley's book The Doors of Perception, itself derived from a line in William Blake's The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: "If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is: infinite".[22] In mid-1965, after Manzarek's two brothers left, the group recruited guitarist Robby Krieger and the best-known lineup — Morrison, Manzarek, Krieger and Densmore — was complete. Whisky a Go Go By 1966, the group was playing the Los Angeles club London Fog. The club was not as prestigious as the Whisky a Go Go and did not attract many customers. The Doors used the nearly empty club as an opportunity to hone and, in some cases, lengthen their songs and work "The End", "When the Music's Over" and "Light My Fire" into musical epics. (In 2011 a 30-minute tape was discovered of the Doors performing at the London Fog.[23]) The Doors soon graduated to the more esteemed Whisky a Go Go, where they were the house band, supporting acts including Van Morrison's group Them. On their last night together the two bands joined up for "In the Midnight Hour" and a twenty-minute jam session of Them's "Gloria".[24] Prior to graduating to the Whisky a Go Go, Morrison went to many record labels trying to land a deal. He did score one at Columbia Records but it did not pan out. Prior to that, The Doors first recording was a demo they did for Richard Bock's Pacific Jazz Records subsidiary label, Aura Records, recorded on September 2, 1965.. On August 10, they were spotted by Elektra Records president Jac Holzman, who was present at the recommendation of Love singer Arthur Lee, whose group was with Elektra Records. After Holzman and producer Paul A. Rothchild saw two sets of the band playing at the Whisky a Go Go, they signed them to the Elektra Records label on August 18 — the start of a long and successful partnership with Rothchild and engineer Bruce Botnick. The Doors were fired from the Whisky on August 21, 1966 when Morrison added an explicit retelling and profanity-laden version of the Greek myth of Oedipus during "The End".[25] Debut album The Doors performing at Fantasy Fair and Magic Mountain Music Festival in 1967 The band recorded their first album from August 24 to 31, 1966, at Sunset Sound Recording Studios. The Doors' self-titled debut LP was released in the first week of January 1967. It featured most of the major songs from their set, including the nearly 12-minute musical drama "The End". In November 1966, Mark Abramson directed a promotional film for the lead single "Break On Through (To the Other Side)". To promote the single, the Doors made their television debut on a Los Angeles TV show called Boss City circa 1966, possibly early 1967, and then on a Los Angeles TV show called Shebang, miming to "Break On Through", on New Year's Day 1967. This clip has never been officially released by the Doors. In early 1967 the Doors appeared on The Clay Cole Show (which aired on Saturday evenings at 6 pm on WPIX Channel 11 out of NYC) where they performed their single "Break On Through". Research has determined that the tapes were all wiped. The only shows that still exist are the final ones copied by an employee of the station, although this was long after the Doors' appearance. The Doors returned to The Clay Cole Show a second time on June 24 where they most likely performed "Light My Fire".[citation needed] Since "Break on Through" was not very successful on the radio, the band turned to "Light My Fire". The problem with this song was that it was seven minutes long, so producer Paul Rothchild cut it down to three minutes by radically cutting the lengthy keyboard and guitar solos in the center section. "Light My Fire" became the first single from Elektra Records to reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, selling over one million copies.[26] "Light My Fire" was the first song ever written by Robby Krieger and was the beginning of the band's success. Early live recordings at the Matrix The group in 1966 (l-r): Morrison, Densmore, Krieger and (seated) Manzarek. From March 7 to 11, 1967, the Doors

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